"Price data" Definition
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 Glossary   >   P   >   "Price data" Definition   

        Price data

Virtually all the charts and indicators used by technical analysts are based on price data. Price data is a record of the day-to-day share price over a period. Of course share prices move during the day, so in plotting the share price on, for instance, 11th April 2002, you could actually pick from 7 prices:Opening price - the price of the first trade of the dayHigh - the highest price at which the share traded during the dayLow - the lowest price at which the share traded during the dayClose - the final price at which the share traded during the dayBid - the price that a market maker is willing to pay for a financial instrument and the price you will receive if you are sellingAsk - the price at which a market maker is willing to sell you a share and the price you will pay if you are buyingMid - the price midway between the bid and asking price of a shareWhere do you get price data from? The laborious way is to plot it yourself by looking in the newspaper every day which will usually quote the mid-price, or consulting Teletext or Ceefax. An easier way is to invest in a technical analysis software package, most of which come with historic data on all the FTSE companies, plus charting features and analysis tools. Many financial websites provide price data and charts free of charge.

Price data


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Price data - Virtually all the charts and indicators used by technical analysts are based on price data. Price data is a record of the day-to-day share price over a period. Of course share prices move during the day, so in plotting the share price on, for instance, 11th April 2002, you could actually pick from 7 prices:Opening price - the price of the first trade of the dayHigh - the highest price at which the share traded during the dayLow - the lowest price at which the share traded during the dayClose - the final price at which the share traded during the dayBid - the price that a market maker is willing to pay for a financial instrument and the price you will receive if you are sellingAsk - the price at which a market maker is willing to sell you a share and the price you will pay if you are buyingMid - the price midway between the bid and asking price of a shareWhere do you get price data from? The laborious way is to plot it yourself by looking in the newspaper every day which will usually quote the mid-price, or consulting Teletext or Ceefax. An easier way is to invest in a technical analysis software package, most of which come with historic data on all the FTSE companies, plus charting features and analysis tools. Many financial websites provide price data and charts free of charge.


Price data : virtually all the charts and indicators used by technical analysts are based on price data. price data is a record of the day-to-day share price over a period. of course share prices move during the day, so in plotting the share price on, for instance, 11th april 2002, you could actually pick from 7 prices:opening price - the price of the first trade of the dayhigh - the highest price at which the share traded during the daylow - the lowest price at which the share traded during the dayclose - the final price at which the share traded during the daybid - the price that a market maker is willing to pay for a financial instrument and the price you will receive if you are sellingask - the price at which a market maker is willing to sell you a share and the price you will pay if you are buyingmid - the price midway between the bid and asking price of a sharewhere do you get price data from? the laborious way is to plot it yourself by looking in the newspaper every day which will usually quote the mid-price, or consulting teletext or ceefax. an easier way is to invest in a technical analysis software package, most of which come with historic data on all the ftse companies, plus charting features and analysis tools. many financial websites provide price data and charts free of charge.